Illustration of a woman reading a book

Get in the Loop

Have you — or has someone you know — ever gone to a play, seminar, house of worship, or musical performance, optimized your hearing device settings, and still had trouble hearing?

Why does this happen?

Hearing in Public Spaces

When you listen to a live speech, classroom lesson, classical guitarist, or clergyperson, your hearing device uses a built-in microphone to capture the sound waves in the room. The sound is processed according to how your devices are programmed and then sent to your ear.

No matter how well your hearing device matches your hearing needs, however, other things in the room impact the sound waves before they reach your hearing device — for example, any background noise and the acoustics of the room.

What if there was a way to avoid all that impact?

There is.  

The Hearing Loop

More and more organizations are installing something called a …

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Look for the Loop

Touring a new city? Some sites — museums, theaters, houses of worship, and more — may have installed a hearing loop, letting you receive enhanced audio by wirelessly connecting through the T-coil setting on your hearing aid, if it has been enabled. Look for the hearing-loop logo at participating spots.

 

Hearing Loop

Discover AGXchange

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Traditional hearing aids are designed to help those with hearing loss better hear and understand the acoustic characteristics of speech — but not so much music. In honor of Jazz Appreciation Month, celebrated during April, here are some hearing tips, tricks, and accessories for enjoying music the way the musician intended.

 

Speech Versus Song

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Hearing Enhancement of Gallaudet University explains the difference between speech and music: “The acoustic characteristics of music are quite different from speech, and a hearing aid that works well for speech perception may not be appropriate when listening to music. For example, the range between the softest sounds of speech (the voiceless th) and the loudest (the vowel aw) is about 30 to 35 decibels, while even the loudest speech signal rarely exceeds 85 to 90.

“In music, the range between the softest and loudest …

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